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Many people may not think about this, but grape vines are an angiosperm, which means they are a flowering plant. The reason many people do not off hand think of grape vines as having flowers is that the petals are joined not at the base, like in more familiar garden variety flowers that unfold to show colorful petals at bloom (think of a rose for example), but at the tip, and thus the petals fall off in what is termed a “cap” as the flower unfolds.

This does not mean that flowering grapes can not be somewhat ostentatious in their own way. And of the varieties I grow, I have found that Hungarian Turán (aka Agria) gives the most showy display at bloom time.

Turán (aka Agria) in bloom.

Turán (aka Agria) in bloom.

Turán (aka Agria) in bloom.

Turán (aka Agria) in bloom.

Turán (aka Agria) in bloom.

Turán (aka Agria) in bloom.

Close up of grape flowers, most just before blooming, but with some already bloomed (see the white stamens), and the absence of petals, which simply fall off when the flower blooms.

Close up of grape flowers, most just before blooming, but with some already bloomed (see the white stamens), and the absence of petals, which simply fall off when the flower blooms.

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